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The weight of an idea...

“ As I use these ideas of seeing-yourself-sensing or sensing-yourself-seeing, they are about trying to introduce relationships between having an experience and simultaneously evaluating and being aware that you are having this experience. It’s not about experience versus interpretation but about the experience inside the interpretive act, about the experience itself being interpretive. You could say that I’m trying to put the body in the mind and the mind in the body. ”

—    by Olafur Eliasson 
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Seeing myself sensing.

Seeing myself sensing. As I’m writing my piece on embodied philosophy for this summer inquiry project with Wisdom Hackers, I find this paragraph from an interview with #OlafurEliasson, one of the artists that is most influencing my performance art and experience design practice. It’s about understanding the relationship between body and experience, between mind and behavior, specially these days that we cannot pass more than 5 minutes without our phones, tablets or computers.  I propose we develop a practice of self-examination about how we sense ourselves while we interact with our digital devices and how we express through our digital identities. I’m starting to look at perception psychology, brain science and linguistics to make sense of how our perception and experience is changing due to our digital and networked life.  

As I use these ideas of seeing-yourself-sensing or sensing-yourself-seeing, they are about trying to introduce relationships between having an experience and simultaneously evaluating and being aware that you are having this experience. It’s not about experience versus interpretation but about the experience inside the interpretive act, about the experience itself being interpretive. You could say that I’m trying to put the body in the mind and the mind in the body”  eloquently expresses the artist Olafur Eliasson

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Olafur Eliasson is one of the contemporary artists that is influencing my thought and artistic practice the most. His multi-disciplinary craft explores time, space, light and perception through art installations and digital provocations. Here, he uses simple hand gestures to make us realize how the perfect symmetry of our hands can symbolize our interconnectedness. The pieces makes us ‘see ourselves sensing, and to sense ourselves seeing’. 

All of it employing shifting frames of reference that are shared with science, psychology and architecture. In this growing body of “objectless” works, experience and perception, rather than a supposedly unmediated thing-in-itself, have become Eliasson’s elusive subject, says Chris Gilbert in this great interview with the artist, in BOMB Magazine. 

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Collected Fictions

Jorge Luis Borges

The complete fiction of Jorge Luis Borges, whom Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa calls “the most important Spanish-language writer since Cervantes”
A New York Times Notable Book
The International Bestseller
For the first time in English, all of the best Latin American writer Jorge Luis Borges’s dazzling fictions are collected in a single volume in brilliant new translations by Andrew Hurley. From his 1935 debut with The Universal History of Iniquity through his immensely influential collections Ficciones and The Aleph, the enigmatic prose poems of The Maker, up to his final work in the 1980s, Shakespeare’s Memory, these enigmatic, elaborate, imaginative inventions display Borges’s talent for turning fiction on its head by playing with form and genre and toying with language.
For some fifty years, in intriguing and ingenious fictions that reimagined the very form of the short story, Borges returned again and again to his celebrated themes: dreams, duels, labyrinths, mirrors, infinite libraries, the manipulations of chance, gauchos, knife fighters, tigers, and the elusive nature of identity itself. Playfully experimenting with ostensibly subliterary genres, Borges took the detective story and turned it into metaphysics; he took fantasy writing and made it, with its questioning and reinventing of everyday reality, central to the craft of fiction; he took the literary essay and put it to use reviewing wholly imaginary books.
Commemorating the 100th anniversary of his birth, this edition at last brings together all of Borges’s magical short stories. Collected Fictions is the definitive one-volume compendium for all those who have long loved Borges, and a superb introduction to the Argentine master’s work for those who have yet to discover him.
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As pristine as the visions in the North Shore, may this inspire your understanding of the universe and our interconnectedness.

Cosmic Flower Unfolding is a constant flow of emerging and dissolving oceanic, futuristic, and mandala forms. It is a tribute to abstraction, it’s connection to the inner space we inhabit and how it can be externalized.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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“ There is always another breath in my breath, another thought in my thought, another possession in what I possess, a thousand things and a thousand beings implicated in my complications: every true thought is an aggression. It is not a question of our undergoing influences, but of being ‘insufflations’ and fluctuations, or merging with them. That everything is so ‘complicated,’ that I may be an other, that something else thinks in us in an aggression which is the aggression of thought, in a multiplication which is the multiplication of the body, or in a violence which is the violence of language—this is the joyful message. For we are so sure of living again (without resurrection) only because so many beings and things think in us… ”

—    Gilles Deleuze, “Phantasm and Modern Literature,” The Logic of Sense (via heteroglossia)

(via ellempire)

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“ I’m almost never serious, and I’m always too serious. Too deep, too shallow. Too sensitive, too cold hearted. I’m like a collection of paradoxes. ”

—    Ferdinand Von Schrubentauffrt  (via thatkindofwoman)

Ibidem

(Source: word-digest, via thatkindofwoman)

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The house needs some life. Preparing small flower arrangements. #haikuflower #guerillagardening

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MANTRA | MUDRA | MOVEMENT

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July 27 and August 10, 1-3pm at Yoga Loft Hawaii 
I’m excited to share that I will be co-teaching this workshop ion Hawaii with my dearest Erica Jago, Yogini, super talented designer and a deep inspiration for my journey as creative healer. Join us on a summer Sunday afternoon while we explore:

MANTRA: healing energy of sound vibrations 

MUDRA: yoga for the hands 

MOVEMENT: Kundalini and Vinyasa Flow

Sign up for both classes and receive a $10 credit towards the series. Call 808.721.9818 to RSVP. 

About the Hosts:
Erica Jago is an accomplished graphic designer who’s book Art of Attention was ranked #1 for design on Amazon. In Erica’s teachings, design is vital for transforming instructional concepts into artful and meaningful class experiences.  

Maricarmen Sierra is an experience designer and multidisciplinary mind-body artist with over 10 years of experience teaching yoga and the art of presence. She was born in Mexico City and is currently living in San Francisco, sharing her practice with innovators and creative leaders, helping them grow into deeper presence. She has a passion for mudras, mantras and movement, as beacons of the subtle and the sacred.

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“ What is the optimal balance between social immersion and creative solitude? Why does interpersonal conflict so often coincide with innovation? Looking at pairs allows us to grapple with these questions, which are as basic to the human experience as the push and pull of love itself. As a culture, we’ve long been preoccupied with romance. But we should also take seriously something just as important, but long overlooked — creative intimacy. ”

—    

Joshua Wolf Shenk, author of Powers of Two: Finding the Essence of Innovation in Creative Pairs, considers the end of the sole genius myth in a New York Times op-ed. (Hemingway, of course, would disagree – in his short and spectacular 1954 Nobel Prize acceptance speech, he spoke to the creative value of working alone.)

A side observation: The op-ed seems to be the new-old book trailer. Shenk recently wrote a similar piece for The Atlantic

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)

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