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The weight of an idea...

10 Great Reads about Consumerism

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Your Lifestyle Has Already Been Designed by David Cain - Why the modern world is so great at making us spend

The Gollum Effect by Venkat Rao - Is Gollum the perfect consumer?

Ad nauseam by Adam Corner - How advertisers are anti-consumerism to make us consume more

Consumer Vertigo by Virginia Postrel - Is there such a thing as too much choice?

Inconspicuous Consumption by Virgina Postrel - How race and social class affect the way we spend

Sweatpants in Paradise by Molly Young - On the rise of the ‘immersive’ shopping

Nothing Grows Forever by Clive Thompson - How can the world sustian 7 billion people? We need to stop buying so much stuff

How Target Knows Your Secrets by Charles Duhigg - Can your shopping habits tell a company that you’r pregnant before you know it yourself??

Selling Out by David McRaney - How status drives consumerism and the capitalist economy

Proceed to Checkout by Dan Ariely - How online companies get you to share more and spend more

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“ As I use these ideas of seeing-yourself-sensing or sensing-yourself-seeing, they are about trying to introduce relationships between having an experience and simultaneously evaluating and being aware that you are having this experience. It’s not about experience versus interpretation but about the experience inside the interpretive act, about the experience itself being interpretive. You could say that I’m trying to put the body in the mind and the mind in the body. ”

—    by Olafur Eliasson 
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Seeing myself sensing.

Seeing myself sensing. As I’m writing my piece on embodied philosophy for this summer inquiry project with Wisdom Hackers, I find this paragraph from an interview with #OlafurEliasson, one of the artists that is most influencing my performance art and experience design practice. It’s about understanding the relationship between body and experience, between mind and behavior, specially these days that we cannot pass more than 5 minutes without our phones, tablets or computers.  I propose we develop a practice of self-examination about how we sense ourselves while we interact with our digital devices and how we express through our digital identities. I’m starting to look at perception psychology, brain science and linguistics to make sense of how our perception and experience is changing due to our digital and networked life.  

As I use these ideas of seeing-yourself-sensing or sensing-yourself-seeing, they are about trying to introduce relationships between having an experience and simultaneously evaluating and being aware that you are having this experience. It’s not about experience versus interpretation but about the experience inside the interpretive act, about the experience itself being interpretive. You could say that I’m trying to put the body in the mind and the mind in the body”  eloquently expresses the artist Olafur Eliasson

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Olafur Eliasson is one of the contemporary artists that is influencing my thought and artistic practice the most. His multi-disciplinary craft explores time, space, light and perception through art installations and digital provocations. Here, he uses simple hand gestures to make us realize how the perfect symmetry of our hands can symbolize our interconnectedness. The pieces makes us ‘see ourselves sensing, and to sense ourselves seeing’. 

All of it employing shifting frames of reference that are shared with science, psychology and architecture. In this growing body of “objectless” works, experience and perception, rather than a supposedly unmediated thing-in-itself, have become Eliasson’s elusive subject, says Chris Gilbert in this great interview with the artist, in BOMB Magazine. 

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Collected Fictions

Jorge Luis Borges

The complete fiction of Jorge Luis Borges, whom Nobel Prize winner Mario Vargas Llosa calls “the most important Spanish-language writer since Cervantes”
A New York Times Notable Book
The International Bestseller
For the first time in English, all of the best Latin American writer Jorge Luis Borges’s dazzling fictions are collected in a single volume in brilliant new translations by Andrew Hurley. From his 1935 debut with The Universal History of Iniquity through his immensely influential collections Ficciones and The Aleph, the enigmatic prose poems of The Maker, up to his final work in the 1980s, Shakespeare’s Memory, these enigmatic, elaborate, imaginative inventions display Borges’s talent for turning fiction on its head by playing with form and genre and toying with language.
For some fifty years, in intriguing and ingenious fictions that reimagined the very form of the short story, Borges returned again and again to his celebrated themes: dreams, duels, labyrinths, mirrors, infinite libraries, the manipulations of chance, gauchos, knife fighters, tigers, and the elusive nature of identity itself. Playfully experimenting with ostensibly subliterary genres, Borges took the detective story and turned it into metaphysics; he took fantasy writing and made it, with its questioning and reinventing of everyday reality, central to the craft of fiction; he took the literary essay and put it to use reviewing wholly imaginary books.
Commemorating the 100th anniversary of his birth, this edition at last brings together all of Borges’s magical short stories. Collected Fictions is the definitive one-volume compendium for all those who have long loved Borges, and a superb introduction to the Argentine master’s work for those who have yet to discover him.
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As pristine as the visions in the North Shore, may this inspire your understanding of the universe and our interconnectedness.

Cosmic Flower Unfolding is a constant flow of emerging and dissolving oceanic, futuristic, and mandala forms. It is a tribute to abstraction, it’s connection to the inner space we inhabit and how it can be externalized.

(Source: vimeo.com)

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“ There is always another breath in my breath, another thought in my thought, another possession in what I possess, a thousand things and a thousand beings implicated in my complications: every true thought is an aggression. It is not a question of our undergoing influences, but of being ‘insufflations’ and fluctuations, or merging with them. That everything is so ‘complicated,’ that I may be an other, that something else thinks in us in an aggression which is the aggression of thought, in a multiplication which is the multiplication of the body, or in a violence which is the violence of language—this is the joyful message. For we are so sure of living again (without resurrection) only because so many beings and things think in us… ”

—    Gilles Deleuze, “Phantasm and Modern Literature,” The Logic of Sense (via heteroglossia)

(via ellempire)

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